Integrated Environmental Services, Inc. (IES)

Integrated Environmental Services, Inc. (IES)

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Our experience and leadership, excellent client relationships and outstanding reputation are our strengths. All of this and more has placed us as one of the most respected environmental firms in the world.

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Technologies for the on-site remediation of high hazard waste.

Technologies for the on-site remediation of high hazard waste.

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IES is an inventor and innovator of the most advanced equipment used in the environmental remediation community. We hold 30 patents related to remediation, reclamation, and processing of high hazard materials.

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Compressed Gas Cylinders

Compressed Gas Cylinders

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Handling waste compressed gas cylinders poses unique hazards and challenges associated with the chemical composition of each gas, the energy of compression, and the capability of a gas to move and flow freely when not contained.

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Process Safety Management

Process Safety Management

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"In response to the Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (HHC) standard IES has developed programs designed to prevent or minimize the consequences of catastrophic releases of HHCs.

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Oman 2012

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Chlorine Cylinder Inventory

Chlorine. To many people, the word conjures images of swimming pools or coughing soldiers and mist-covered trenches from a distant but horrible war. In fact, chlorine is largely responsible for saving lives around the world as an easy-to-use water disinfectant. In recent years, however, its use in small-scale water treatment operations has given way to more modern disinfection technologies. As a result, many chlorine cylinders have been placed to the side awaiting return to vendors that may or may not take them back or simply stored out of the way and forgotten.

 IES recently completed chlorine cylinder processing operations in the Sultanate of Oman.  The project involved neutralizing and decommissioning 32 cylinders stored in a warehouse area for over 20 years.  While most of the cylinders were found to be in good condition, several had leaked and severely corroded the valve and valve cap.  The valves that were intact were configured with an outlet that did not match any of the standard fittings and local sources had long since stopped carrying the proper fitting. 

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Cylinder Processing

As a result, the cylinder contents were removed almost exclusively using a saddle and penetrator device that creates a small hole in the target cylinder sidewall that then serves as a drain port for the chlorine.

Logistics always play a major role when conducting operations overseas and this project began with packaging and shipping all the necessary equipment to Muscat, Oman via ocean transport. After a journey that lasted almost two months, the equipment arrived safely and was staged at the oil terminal complex where the cylinders were located.

While performing the work in Oman, IES enjoyed Winter temperatures averaging a pleasant daily high of 80°F (summer temperatures can rise to 130°F). However, working in the direct sun proved to be nearly impossible for the Atlanta-based crew. Two small tents sent with the processing equipment provided shade throughout the operation and allowed work to be done during daylight hours.

Once the operations area had been configured and all the equipment tested, the cylinders were opened using the saddle and penetrator device. More than 1500 pounds of chlorine gas and liquid were directed to a chemical reactor containing a sodium hydroxide/water reagent. During the chemical reaction between chlorine and the sodium hydroxide, common table salt (sodium chloride) was formed and significant amounts of the salt came out of solution and settled to the reactor bottom. Spent reagent was processed in the facility water treatment plant.

Implementing projects outside the US can pose challenges ranging from obtaining appropriate visas to interfacing electrical equipment to the local power grid.  One of the most common hurdles that must be overcome is ensuring electrical motors will run properly on the local power supply. IES has developed its own power inverters that allow connection to a variety of power supplies while producing a steady 120/208 volt, 60 hertz output. This system was use in Oman to power the tools, scrubbers, and compressors needed to support the project.

Close cooperation between the client in Oman and IES led to the project being completed in only six days.  The legacy chlorine cylinders that had haunted the facility warehouse for more than 20 years were safely converted to salt and scrap metal.

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Oman Project Site